Age Of Iron

Author: Angus Watson
Publisher: Hachette UK
ISBN: 9781405528528
Size: 18.61 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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LEGENDS AREN'T BORN. THEY'RE FORGED. Dug Sealskinner is a down-on-his-luck mercenary travelling south to join up with King Zadar's army. But he keeps rescuing the wrong people. First, Spring, a child he finds scavenging on the battlefield, and then Lowa, one of Zadar's most fearsome warriors, who's vowed revenge on the king for her sister's execution. Now Dug's on the wrong side of that thousands-strong army he hoped to join - and worse, Zadar has bloodthirsty druid magic on his side. All Dug has is his war hammer, one rescued child and one unpredictable, highly-trained warrior with a lust for revenge that's going to get them all killed . . . It's a glorious day to die. 'Watson's tale is gore soaked and profanity laden - full of visceral combat and earthy humor, and laced with subtle magic. The blend of historical accuracy and authorial liberties suggests an old-school sword-and-sorcery epic, though with some modern sensibilities thrown in for good measure!' PUBLISHERS WEEKLY 'Would I read the next one? Yes, absolutely. Bring me my hammer, bring my beer, bring it on.' SF CROWSNEST 'Watson has created a brilliant and confident debut . . . If you like your fantasy packed with hammer-wielding heroes, bloodthirsty druids, strong female leads, action, intrigue, betrayal, and a brilliantly conceived world then AGE OF IRON is for you.' THE BOOK BEARD 'Thoroughly entertaining from the get go . . . I really got a kick out of the AGE OF IRON' THE ELOQUENT PAGE

Moab In The Iron Age

Author: Bruce Routledge
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 081223801X
Size: 20.59 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Moab was an ancient kingdom located in the highlands east of the Dead Sea, in what is now Jordan. Known primarily from references in the Hebrew Bible, Moab has long occupied a marginal position, one defined by the complex interrelationship of history, theology, and politics that underlies biblical archaeology. Moab in the Iron Age: Hegemony, Polity, Archaeology inverts this position, using Moab as the centerpiece of an extended reflection on the nature and meaning of state formation. Focusing on the state as an effect rather than a cause, Bruce Routledge examines the constitution of the kingdom over a period of some seven hundred years. In particular, he develops Antonio Gramsci's concept of hegemony by examining the ways intellectual products, such as inscriptions, public buildings, and administrative practices, transformed local cultural resources in order to construct political dominance as a moral order. Through a careful analysis that combines archaeology and textual study, Routledge demonstrates how long-established principles underlying local identities were transformed when appropriated for particular state building projects. From this, he offers insights into the realization and historical reproduction of political power in everyday life. Rich in previously unpublished material, Moab in the Iron Age reinvigorates discussions of politics and culture in early complex societies, and presents a novel approach to the study of state formation.

Archaeology Of The Bronze And Iron Age

Author: Erzsébet Jerem
Publisher: Archaeolingua
ISBN: PSU:000044322069
Size: 18.44 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Proceedings of the International Archaeological Conference at Szazhalombatta, 3-7 October 1996. This collection focuses particularly on environmental and experimental archaeology, never before discussed in professional meetings in Hungary. The Archaeological Parks carry out exciting experimental work in reconstructing prehistoric life, and the contributions on this area contain up-to-date information on their work. Papers in various European languages.

Iron Age Hillforts In Britain And Beyond

Author: Dennis Harding
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199695249
Size: 11.47 MB
Format: PDF
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Widely regarded as major visible field monuments of the Iron Age, hillforts are central to an understanding of later prehistoric communities in Britain and Europe from the later Bronze Age. With such a range of variants represented, no single explanation of their function or social significance could satisfy all possible interpretations of their role. Critically reviewing the evidence of hillforts in Britain, in the wider context of Irelandand continental Europe, the volume focuses on their structural features, chronology, landscape context, and their social, economic and symbolic functions, and is well illustrated throughout with siteplans, reconstruction drawings, and photographs. Harding reviews the changing perceptions of hillforts and the future prospects for hillfort research, highlighting aspects of contemporary investigation and interpretation.

Ceramicus Redivivus

Author: John K. Papadopoulos
Publisher: ASCSA
ISBN: 0876615310
Size: 12.86 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This volume publishes selected material associated with potters' workshops and pottery production from some fourteen Early Iron Age contexts northwest of the Athenian Akropolis that range in date from the Protogeometric through Archaic periods. Located in the area that was to become the Agora of Classical Athens, these deposits establish that the place was used for industrial activity up until the time that it was formally transformed into the civic and commercial center of the city in the early 5th century B.C. The Early Iron Age potters' debris published in this volume sheds light on many aspects of pottery production, in prehistory as well as in the Classical and later periods. The material includes test-pieces, wasters and other production discards, and a variety of other potters' debris; there is also a reassessment of the evidence associated with the kiln underlying the later Tholos. Comparative material is assembled and discussed from other parts of Greece and South Italy, including that from the Potters' Quarters at Corinth and Metaponto, and there is discussion of related material from other cultures. The location of such potters' refuse in the later Agora but in an area that was known in a variety of ancient literary sources as the Kerameikos, suggests that here was the original Potters' Quarter of Athens. Such a conclusion raises a number of concerning the topography of early Athens, including the location of the old Agora, its relationship to the harbours at Phaleron and the Piraeus, and the Early Iron Age settlement of Athens on and immediately around the Akropolis.