Spanish Texas 1519 1821

Author: Donald E. Chipman
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 9780292782631
Size: 11.29 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Modern Texas, like Mexico, traces its beginning to sixteenth-century encounters between Europeans and Indians who contested control over a vast land. Unlike Mexico, however, Texas eventually received the stamp of Anglo-American culture, so that Spanish contributions to present-day Texas tend to be obscured or even unknown. The first edition of Spanish Texas, 1519–1821 (1992) sought to emphasize the significance of the Spanish period in Texas history. Beginning with information on the land and its inhabitants before the arrival of Europeans, the original volume covered major people and events from early exploration to the end of the colonial era. This new edition of Spanish Texas has been extensively revised and expanded to include a wealth of discoveries about Texas history since 1990. The opening chapter on Texas Indians reveals their high degree of independence from European influence and extended control over their own lives. Other chapters incorporate new information on La Salle's Garcitas Creek colony and French influences in Texas, the destruction of the San Sabá mission and the Spanish punitive expedition to the Red River in the late 1750s, and eighteenth-century Bourbon reforms in the Americas. Drawing on their own and others' research, the authors also provide more inclusive coverage of the role of women of various ethnicities in Spanish Texas and of the legal rights of women on the Texas frontier, demonstrating that whether European or Indian, elite or commoner, slave owner or slave, women enjoyed legal protections not heretofore fully appreciated.

Explorers And Settlers Of Spanish Texas

Author: Donald Eugene Chipman
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 9780292793156
Size: 16.55 MB
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In Notable Men and Women of Spanish Texas, Donald Chipman and Harriett Joseph combined dramatic, real-life incidents, biographical sketches, and historical background to reveal the real human beings behind the legendary figures who discovered, explored, and settled Spanish Texas from 1528 to 1821. Drawing from their earlier book and adapting the language and subject matter to the reading level and interests of middle and high school students, the authors here present the men and women of Spanish Texas for young adult readers and their teachers. These biographies demonstrate how much we have in common with our early forebears. Profiled in this book are: Alvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca: Ragged Castaway Francisco Vázquez de Coronado: Golden Conquistador María de Agreda: Lady in Blue Alonso de León: Texas Pathfinder Domingo Terán de los Ríos / Francisco Hidalgo: Angry Governor and Man with a Mission Louis St. Denis / Manuela Sánchez: Cavalier and His Bride Antonio Margil de Jesús: God's Donkey Marqués de San Miguel de Aguayo: Chicken War Redeemer Felipe de Rábago y Terán: Sinful Captain José de Escandón y Elguera: Father of South Texas Athanase de Mézières: Troubled Indian Agent Domingo Cabello: Comanche Peacemaker Marqués de Rubí / Antonio Gil Ibarvo: Harsh Inspector and Father of East Texas Bernardo Gutiérrez de Lara / Joaquín de Arredondo: Rebel Captain and Vengeful Royalist Women in Colonial Texas: Pioneer Settlers Women and the Law: Rights and Responsibilities

Tejano South Texas

Author: Daniel D. Arreola
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 9780292793149
Size: 20.12 MB
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On the plains between the San Antonio River and the Rio Grande lies the heartland of what is perhaps the largest ethnic region in the United States, Tejano South Texas. In this cultural geography, Daniel Arreola charts the many ways in which Texans of Mexican ancestry have established a cultural province in this Texas-Mexico borderland that is unlike any other Mexican American region. Arreola begins by delineating South Texas as an environmental and cultural region. He then explores who the Tejanos are, where in Mexico they originated, and how and where they settled historically in South Texas. Moving into the present, he examines many factors that make Tejano South Texas distinctive from other Mexican American regions—the physical spaces of ranchos, plazas, barrios, and colonias; the cultural life of the small towns and the cities of San Antonio and Laredo; and the foods, public celebrations, and political attitudes that characterize the region. Arreola's findings thus offer a new appreciation for the great cultural diversity that exists within the Mexican American borderlands.

The City In Texas

Author: David G. McComb
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 9780292767461
Size: 16.45 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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"This book is the first history of cities in Texas, covering the earliest days of Spanish-Mexican towns, the Republic era to about 1940, and metropolitan Texas to the present. Not only is this book a first for Texas, but there seem to be no equivalent books for any other states, so the author has developed new concepts like 'the first road frontier' and the 'rupture' caused by the railroads. McComb emphasizes how railroads and related innovations such as the telegraph and the clock facilitated in urban development"--Provided by publisher.

San Juan Bautista

Author: Robert S. Weddle
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 9780292776517
Size: 11.21 MB
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In their efforts to assert dominion over vast reaches of the (now U.S.) Southwest in the seventeenth century, the Spanish built a series of far-flung missions and presidios at strategic locations. One of the most important of these was San Juan Bautista del Río Grande, located at the present-day site of Guerrero in Coahuila, Mexico. Despite its significance as the main entry point into Spanish Texas during the colonial period, San Juan Bautista was generally forgotten until the first publication of this book in 1968. Weddle's narrative is a fascinating chronicle of the many religious, military, colonial, and commerical expeditions that passed through San Juan and a valuable addition to knowledge of the Spanish borderlands. It won the Texas Institute of Letters Amon G. Carter Award for Best Southwest History in 1969.