Spanish Texas 1519 1821

Author: Donald E. Chipman
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 9780292782631
Size: 17.50 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Modern Texas, like Mexico, traces its beginning to sixteenth-century encounters between Europeans and Indians who contested control over a vast land. Unlike Mexico, however, Texas eventually received the stamp of Anglo-American culture, so that Spanish contributions to present-day Texas tend to be obscured or even unknown. The first edition of Spanish Texas, 1519–1821 (1992) sought to emphasize the significance of the Spanish period in Texas history. Beginning with information on the land and its inhabitants before the arrival of Europeans, the original volume covered major people and events from early exploration to the end of the colonial era. This new edition of Spanish Texas has been extensively revised and expanded to include a wealth of discoveries about Texas history since 1990. The opening chapter on Texas Indians reveals their high degree of independence from European influence and extended control over their own lives. Other chapters incorporate new information on La Salle's Garcitas Creek colony and French influences in Texas, the destruction of the San Sabá mission and the Spanish punitive expedition to the Red River in the late 1750s, and eighteenth-century Bourbon reforms in the Americas. Drawing on their own and others' research, the authors also provide more inclusive coverage of the role of women of various ethnicities in Spanish Texas and of the legal rights of women on the Texas frontier, demonstrating that whether European or Indian, elite or commoner, slave owner or slave, women enjoyed legal protections not heretofore fully appreciated.

Explorers And Settlers Of Spanish Texas

Author: Donald Eugene Chipman
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 9780292793156
Size: 11.44 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In Notable Men and Women of Spanish Texas, Donald Chipman and Harriett Joseph combined dramatic, real-life incidents, biographical sketches, and historical background to reveal the real human beings behind the legendary figures who discovered, explored, and settled Spanish Texas from 1528 to 1821. Drawing from their earlier book and adapting the language and subject matter to the reading level and interests of middle and high school students, the authors here present the men and women of Spanish Texas for young adult readers and their teachers. These biographies demonstrate how much we have in common with our early forebears. Profiled in this book are: Alvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca: Ragged Castaway Francisco Vázquez de Coronado: Golden Conquistador María de Agreda: Lady in Blue Alonso de León: Texas Pathfinder Domingo Terán de los Ríos / Francisco Hidalgo: Angry Governor and Man with a Mission Louis St. Denis / Manuela Sánchez: Cavalier and His Bride Antonio Margil de Jesús: God's Donkey Marqués de San Miguel de Aguayo: Chicken War Redeemer Felipe de Rábago y Terán: Sinful Captain José de Escandón y Elguera: Father of South Texas Athanase de Mézières: Troubled Indian Agent Domingo Cabello: Comanche Peacemaker Marqués de Rubí / Antonio Gil Ibarvo: Harsh Inspector and Father of East Texas Bernardo Gutiérrez de Lara / Joaquín de Arredondo: Rebel Captain and Vengeful Royalist Women in Colonial Texas: Pioneer Settlers Women and the Law: Rights and Responsibilities

Spanish Expeditions Into Texas 1689 1768

Author: William C. Foster
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 9780292793132
Size: 20.50 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Mapping old trails has a romantic allure at least as great as the difficulty involved in doing it. In this book, William Foster produces the first highly accurate maps of the eleven Spanish expeditions from northeastern Mexico into what is now East Texas during the years 1689 to 1768. Foster draws upon the detailed diaries that each expedition kept of its route, cross-checking the journals among themselves and against previously unused eighteenth-century Spanish maps, modern detailed topographic maps, aerial photographs, and on-site inspections. From these sources emerges a clear picture of where the Spanish explorers actually passed through Texas. This information, which corrects many previous misinterpretations, will be widely valuable. Old names of rivers and landforms will be of interest to geographers. Anthropologists and archaeologists will find new information on encounters with some 139 named Indian tribes. Botanists and zoologists will see changes in the distribution of flora and fauna with increasing European habitation, and climatologists will learn more about the "Little Ice Age" along the Rio Grande.

This Corner Of Canaan

Author: Richard B. McCaslin
Publisher: University of North Texas Press
ISBN: 9781574415032
Size: 15.30 MB
Format: PDF
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Randolph B. “Mike” Campbell has spent the better part of the last five decades helping Texans rediscover their history, producing a stream of definitive works on the social, political, and economic structures of the Texas past. Through meticulous research and terrific prose, Campbell's collective work has fundamentally remade how historians understand Texan identity and the state's southern heritage, as well as our understanding of such contentious issues as slavery, westward expansion, and Reconstruction. Campbell's pioneering work in local and county records has defined the model for grassroots research and community studies in the field. More than any other scholar, Campbell has shaped our modern understanding of Texas. In this collection of seventeen original essays, Campbell's colleagues, friends, and students offer a capacious examination of Texas's history—ranging from the Spanish era through the 1960s War on Poverty—to honor Campbell's deep influence on the field. Focusing on themes and methods that Campbell pioneered, the essays debate Texas identity, the creation of nineteenth-century Texas, the legacies of the Civil War and Reconstruction, and the remaking of the Lone Star State during the twentieth century. Featuring some of the most well-known names in the field—as well as rising stars—the volume offers the latest scholarship on major issues in Texas history, and the enduring influence of the most eminent Texas historian of the last half century.

The City In Texas

Author: David G. McComb
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 9780292767461
Size: 20.85 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 84

"This book is the first history of cities in Texas, covering the earliest days of Spanish-Mexican towns, the Republic era to about 1940, and metropolitan Texas to the present. Not only is this book a first for Texas, but there seem to be no equivalent books for any other states, so the author has developed new concepts like 'the first road frontier' and the 'rupture' caused by the railroads. McComb emphasizes how railroads and related innovations such as the telegraph and the clock facilitated in urban development"--Provided by publisher.

El Mesquite

Author: Elena Zamora O'Shea
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 1585441082
Size: 18.29 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The open country of Texas between the Nueces River and the Rio Grande was sparsely settled through the nineteenth century, and most of the settlers who did live there had Hispanic names that until recently were rarely admitted into the pages of Texas history. In 1935, however, a descendant of one of the old Spanish land-grant families in the region-a woman, no less-found an ingenious way to publish the history of her region at a time when neither Tejanos nor women had much voice. She told the story from the perspective of an ancient mesquite tree, under whose branches much South Texas history had passed. Her tale became an invaluable source of folk history but has long been out of print. Now, with important new introductions by Leticia M. Garza-Falcon and Andres Tijerina, the history witnessed by El Mesquite can again inform readers of the way of life that first shaped Texas. Through the voice of the gnarled old tree, Elena Zamora O'Shea tells South Texas political and ethnographic history, filled with details of daily life such as songs, local plants and folk medicines, foods and recipes, peone/patron relations, and the Tejano ranch vocabulary. The work is an important example of the historical-folkloristic literary genre used by Mexican American writers of the period. Using the literary device of the tree's narration, O'Shea raises issues of culture, discrimination, and prejudice she could not have addressed in her own voice in that day and explicitly states the Mexican American ideology of 1930s Texas. The result is a literary and historic work of lasting value, which clearly articulates the Tejano claim to legitimacy in Texas history. ELENA ZAMORA O'SHEA (1880-1951) was born at Rancho La Noria Cardenena near Penitas, Hidalgo County, Texas. A long-time schoolteacher, whose posts included one on the famous King Ranch, she wrote this book to help Tejano children know and claim their proud heritage."

Spanish Frontier In North America

Author: David J. Weber
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300156218
Size: 15.32 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Winner of the 1993 Western Heritage Award given by the National Cowboy Hall of Fame, here is a definitive history of the Spanish colonial period in North America. Authoritative and colorful, the volume focuses on both the Spaniards' impact on Native Americans and the effect of North Americans on Spanish settlers. "Splendid".--New York Times Book Review.