The Mystery Of Samba

Author: Hermano Vianna
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807898864
Size: 11.14 MB
Format: PDF
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Samba is Brazil's "national rhythm," the foremost symbol of its culture and nationhood. To the outsider, samba and the famous pre-Lenten carnival of which it is the centerpiece seem to showcase the country's African heritage. Within Brazil, however, samba symbolizes the racial and cultural mixture that, since the 1930s, most Brazilians have come to believe defines their unique national identity. But how did Brazil become "the Kingdom of Samba" only a few decades after abolishing slavery in 1888? Typically, samba is represented as having changed spontaneously, mysteriously, from a "repressed" music of the marginal and impoverished to a national symbol cherished by all Brazilians. Here, however, Hermano Vianna shows that the nationalization of samba actually rested on a long history of relations between different social groups--poor and rich, weak and powerful--often working at cross-purposes to one another. A fascinating exploration of the "invention of tradition," The Mystery of Samba is an excellent introduction to Brazil's ongoing conversation on race, popular culture, and national identity.

The Mystery Of Samba

Author: Hermano Vianna
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807847666
Size: 10.89 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 21

Traces how the samba became the national music of Brazil, and argues the aim was to create a distinctively Brazilian identity and the appearance of racial equality

Mist Rio Do Samba

Author: Hermano Vianna
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Pr
ISBN: IND:30000063966406
Size: 18.39 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 38

Traces how the samba became the national music of Brazil, and argues the aim was to create a distinctively Brazilian identity and the appearance of racial equality

The Most Dangerous Area In The World

Author: Stephen G. Rabe
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 9781469617367
Size: 11.91 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 83

In March 1961, President John F. Kennedy announced the formation of the Alliance for Progress, a program dedicated to creating prosperous, socially just, democratic societies throughout Latin America. Over the next few years, the United States spent nearly $20 billion in pursuit of the Alliance's goals, but Latin American economies barely grew, Latin American societies remained inequitable, and sixteen extraconstitutional changes of government rocked the region. In this close, critical analysis, Stephen Rabe explains why Kennedy's grand plan for Latin America proved such a signal policy failure. Drawing on recently declassified materials, Rabe investigates the nature of Kennedy's intense anti-Communist crusade and explores the convictions that drove him to fight the Cold War throughout the Caribbean and Latin America--a region he repeatedly referred to as "the most dangerous area in the world." As Rabe acknowledges, Kennedy remains popular in the United States and Latin America, in part for the noble purposes behind the Alliance for Progress. But an unwavering determination to wage Cold War led Kennedy to compromise, even mutilate, those grand goals.

Making Samba

Author: Marc A. Hertzman
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822354307
Size: 18.44 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In November 1916, a young Afro-Brazilian musician named Donga registered sheet music for the song "Pelo telefone" ("On the Telephone") at the National Library in Rio de Janeiro. This apparently simple act—claiming ownership of a musical composition—set in motion a series of events that would shake Brazil's cultural landscape. Before the debut of "Pelo telephone," samba was a somewhat obscure term, but by the late 1920s, the wildly popular song had helped to make it synonymous with Brazilian national music. The success of "Pelo telephone" embroiled Donga in controversy. A group of musicians claimed that he had stolen their work, and a prominent journalist accused him of selling out his people in pursuit of profit and fame. Within this single episode are many of the concerns that animate Making Samba, including intellectual property claims, the Brazilian state, popular music, race, gender, national identity, and the history of Afro-Brazilians in Rio de Janeiro. By tracing the careers of Rio's pioneering black musicians from the late nineteenth century until the 1970s, Marc A. Hertzman revises the histories of samba and of Brazilian national culture.

Hello Hello Brazil

Author: Bryan McCann
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822385639
Size: 18.87 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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“Hello, hello Brazil” was the standard greeting Brazilian radio announcers of the 1930s used to welcome their audience into an expanding cultural marketplace. New genres like samba and repackaged older ones like choro served as the currency in this marketplace, minted in the capital in Rio de Janeiro and circulated nationally by the burgeoning recording and broadcasting industries. Bryan McCann chronicles the flourishing of Brazilian popular music between the 1920s and the 1950s. Through analysis of the competing projects of composers, producers, bureaucrats, and fans, he shows that Brazilians alternately envisioned popular music as the foundation for a unified national culture and used it as a tool to probe racial and regional divisions. McCann explores the links between the growth of the culture industry, rapid industrialization, and the rise and fall of Getúlio Vargas’s Estado Novo dictatorship. He argues that these processes opened a window of opportunity for the creation of enduring cultural patterns and demonstrates that the understandings of popular music cemented in the mid–twentieth century continue to structure Brazilian cultural life in the early twenty-first.

Choro

Author: Tamara Elena Livingston
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 0253217520
Size: 15.48 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 97

The first book in English to explore Brazilian choro.